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Park County Historical Society

Newsletter
April 2020
Special Announcement
In the interest of public safety, the PCHS will suspend all events, including historical presentations and tours, until further notice.

We encourage everyone to follow the advice of health officials at the Federal, State and Local levels.  While all of us are making sacrifices, please try to support our local businesses and service providers.  They need your support and encouragement now more than ever.
Mark your Calendars!

Bailey Day
June 27
The decision to keep, cancel or postpone Bailey Day is currently scheduled for June 27. If postponed, the new proposed date being considered is August 8.  
Each year Bailey Day gets better and better.  And, this year is no exception!

In addition to dozens of venders offering Colorado wares, there are festivities planned for all ages, including many activities at McGraw Memorial Park.

All the historic structures at McGraw Park will be open for visitors. There will be docents at every location to answer any questions you may have.

While the planning is in the early stages, it is not too early to reserved your space on Main Street.  You can make your reservation on-line or by snail-mail at:
After you have made your reservation, continue to monitor this webpage for new information as it developes.
Volunteers Needed

We could always use volunteers to help with Bailey Day.  No experience or skills needed - just a desire to help where you are needed.
 
What can I volunteer to do on Bailey Day, Saturday June 27nd?
  • Need an MC or Master of Ceremonies
  • Need backup hosts for Schoolhouse, Wren Cabin and Entriken Cabin

Contact Jim Glenn at 303-699-8056 or jimglenncolorado@gmail.com

Research on Mammoth Molar

Currently on display at McGraw Memorial Park in Bailey

Research by Jim Glenn

PCHS Vice President, Jim Glenn, has been researching a Columbian Mammoth tooth that has been on display in the Shawnee School for some time. While some information is readily known, there remains many unanswered questions.

 

Columbian Mammoth Tooth

Discovered near Como, Colorado

The Columbian Mammoth roamed south western United States from, 1.5 million years ago 12,000 years ago when they became extinct.

Jim assumes the Mammoth molar at McGraw Memorial Park is part of a Mammoth bone collection at South Park City in Fairplay.  Jim met with former curator, Carol Davis, to learn more about their collection

Carol retired as curator of the South Park City Museum. Carol lives in Alma and has been with the Museum for several decades. Carol started as a temporary bookkeeper at South Park City in 1973. 

Jim met Carol at South Park City in early March. South Park City also has a Mastodon tooth, a leg bone, several ribs and a tusk from Como.  They believe the collection is from a discovery by Jack Portice, resident of Como.

Jack has lived on 40 acres in Como since 1985. He was visited between 1987-89 at his Mountain Man Gallery in Como by two US Geological Survey (USGS) scientists, Bob O’Donnell (Paleontology Technician) and Ed Lewis (Paleontologist). They had USGS records from 1954 and 1969 about a Columbian Mammoth discovery on Jack’s property. 

Columbian Mammoth


Bob O’Donnell had a weekend cabin in the Buffalo subdivision. Upon searching on Jack’s property, they found their first bone, a round ball protruding from a gully washout that had been uncovered. The round ball was a distal end of a Mammoth leg bone.

Records from 1954 indicate that a mandible or lower jaw was collected with well- preserved molars, ribs and parts of a tusk. The Mammoth jaw was in a cabinet at the USGS for years but has now been transferred to the Smithsonian. Jack still has a Mammoth vertebrae that he preserved in plaster. The bones are registered with the Smithsonian as the highest find of a Columbian Mammoth at 9,600 ft (highest as of 1991). 

Bob O’Donnell’s research placed the Mammoth at 7 years of age (possibly using the molar) and 20,000 years old. More findings since 1989 estimate the Columbian Mammoth was extinct 11,000 years ago, not 20,000 years.

Most all digging was by shovel near the gully. A backhoe was brought in and dug along side away from the gully. The goal was to be at the same level as the other bones, but they found nothing more. 

Paleontologists from the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and from a Nebraska Museum also came out and dug, but found nothing. 

When Jack and Vicky were getting ready to move to Canon City they gave their glass display cabinet with the Mammoth artifacts to South Park City where it is now on display in the Summer Saloon. 

Someone donated a Mammoth molar to the Park County Historical Society and it is displayed in McGraw Memorial Park. Who donated it? Was this molar from Como also? 


New and Improved Signs

Coming to McGraw Memorial Park
If you are a regular visitor to McGraw Memorial Park in Bailey, you know that the signage on our historic structures is in need of a face lift. 

We considered making new "home made signs" but decided that the Park needs something better.  Something that could withstand the elements, are easy to read, and were maintenance free and resistant to graffiti and vandalism.  As you might imagine, the attributes come at a price - more than we could afford.

We identified a source to fabricate the signs for us and got a quote for the signs.  If you have ever bought a car, you know exactly what the term "sticker shock" means.

Not willing to give up, we applied for and received a generous grant from the Park County Historic Preservation Advisory Commission (PCHPAC).  

With the funding issue resolved, we designed ten signs for the Park.  Eight signs for our historic structures and two signs to welcome our visitors to the Park.
The signs are 18" x 24", color printed on 1/8" coated aluminum, UV and weather resistant, resistant to graffiti and vandalism, angle mounted on 4" X 4" brown powder coated aluminum posts.  The best feature - guaranteed for 10 years from degradation from the elements. 
Following a period of design and review by our Board of Directors, we submitted the order to Gopher Sign Company.

Gopher Sign Company’s corporate offices are located in St. Paul, Minnesota where their administrative, engineering, graphic design, accounting and sales and marketing are done. Their 60,000 square foot manufacturing facility is located in Clear Lake, South Dakota.

Following six weeks of anticipation, the signs have finally arrived. So, where are they?

We had planned to have the signs designed, ordered, and installed last fall before the winter season arrived. But, that was not to be.  Each phase seemed to take longer than expected, so the signs are in storage until the ground thaws. However, there is a rumor that spring is just around the corner.  And, perhaps you can help with the installation.

If you have time to spare and could use a little extra cash in your pocket, do we have a job for you.  We need ten post holes dug with sign posts secured with concrete.  We will provide the tools and materials, we just need a good strong back and a willingness to support the PCHS.  Contact us if you are willing and able. No experience necessary.
Plans to relocate the Barnett Cabin
Plans to relocate the Barnett Cabin have been discussed for many years. Thanks to the persistence of Board member and Vice President, Jim Glenn, some progress has been made.

On February 1, 2020, Jim hosted a meeting with Bill and Mary Davis, owners of Mammoth Moving and Rigging Company out of Parker, Colorado. Mammoth Moving has over 40 years of experience moving historic structures, both large and small.

In addition, several Board members also attended the meeting along with Jon Grams, Park County Preservationist and Larry and Sue Villareal (Gail Kingery's daughter and son-in-law).

Following the meeting, Jon Grams provided some preliminary plans on exactly where the Barnett Cabin could be located within McGraw Memorial Park. Of course, the primary purpose of the meeting was to determine if the cabin could be moved and what would it cost.

Mammoth Movers has provided a detailed quote outlining the cost associated with moving the cabin and exactly what the quote included and what the PCHS would be responsible for.

Obviously, the cost to move the cabin and associated costs to prepare a foundation and rehabilitation of the cabin is far beyond the means of the PCHS.

Jon Grams along with Jerry Davis, Historian assigned to the Park County Historic Preservation Advisory Commission, PCHPAC, are researching the historical 
significance of the cabin and contributions Joseph Barnett made to the early history of Bailey.  Their research will be a vital part of the grant application.

There is still much to be done before a grant application can be submitted. However, a journey of a thousand miles.......... you know the rest.

Spring Planting - Volunteers Needed
Mark your calendar!

McGraw Memorial Park Plantings
Tentatively scheduled for Saturday, June 6
10:00am

Want to make Bailey's own park even better? You are invited to plant flowers at McGraw Park on Saturday, June 6 at 10am.  

A fun group of people get to plant in a park by the North Fork of the South Platte.  RSVP so we have enough snacks and water. 

Thank you,

Jim 303-699-8056   jimglenncolorado@gmail.com 





Website News
The "Resources" page of the PCHS website continues to grow.  If you have articles, documents, or informative links to share, please let us know.  This page is invaluable for those who want to learn more about the history and heritage of Park County.

Several new files have been added to the "Resource" section of the PCHS website including:
  • Article: Dake Discovered - Bob Schoppe
  • Article: Cycling through History in Platte Canyon - Paul Hood 
  • Article: Azel Slaghts - J. Gilsinger
  • Article: Azel Slaghts Timeline - J. Gilsinger 
  • Article: Azel Slaghts Property Transactions - J. Gilsinger
  • Article: Early Communities - Slaughts
  • Article: History of the Bailey Country Store 
  • Article: South Park City - RMN June 19, 1966
  • Article: Park County Local History Archives Photo Index
  • Article: PCHS Gold Panning Trip at Tarryall 
  • Article: The Denver, South Park and Pacific Railroad
  • Article: Trip down Tarryall Road 
  • Article: The Blue Sky People were here first 
  • Article:  Bailey - A History Book within itself 
  • Article:  An Interview with Father Dyer 
  • Article:  Historic narrow gauge railcar returns home
  • Article: PCHS heads to Glen-Isle 
  • Document: How to Harvest Ice - Gilford Wood Company, 1912
  • Document: Ice Planer Patent
  • Document: Survey and Inventory of Resources in the Historic Core of Fairplay, Colorado
  • Document: Obituaries
  • Links: Southern Ute Tribe History
  • Links: Preservation Matters Newsletters 
  • Links: Western Mining Towns 
  • Links: Stories from Park County 
New Sections:
South Park Historical Timeline
Oral Histories and Those Who Lived it

 
While the PCHS website is maintained by volunteers, there is an ongoing service provider expense.  If you are in a position to help with this expense, consider a "restricted donation"  to defray this ongoing cost of hosting our website.
The "Resources" page of the PCHS website continues to grow.  If you have articles, documents, or informative links to share, please let us know.  This page is invaluable for those who want to learn more about the history and heritage of Park County.

Several new files have been added to the "Resource" section of the PCHS website including:
  • Article: Dake Discovered - Bob Schoppe
  • Article: Cycling through History in Platte Canyon - Paul Hood 
  • Article: Azel Slaghts - J. Gilsinger
  • Article: Azel Slaghts Timeline - J. Gilsinger 
  • Article: Azel Slaghts Property Transactions - J. Gilsinger
  • Article: Early Communities - Slaughts
  • Article: History of the Bailey Country Store 
  • Article: South Park City - RMN June 19, 1966
  • Article: Park County Local History Archives Photo Index
  • Article: PCHS Gold Panning Trip at Tarryall 
  • Article: The Denver, South Park and Pacific Railroad
  • Article: Trip down Tarryall Road 
  • Article: The Blue Sky People were here first 
  • Article:  Bailey - A History Book within itself 
  • Article:  An Interview with Father Dyer 
  • Article:  Historic narrow gauge railcar returns home
  • Article: PCHS heads to Glen-Isle 
  • Document: How to Harvest Ice - Gilford Wood Company, 1912
  • Document: Ice Planer Patent
  • Document: Survey and Inventory of Resources in the Historic Core of Fairplay, Colorado
  • Document: Obituaries
  • Links: Southern Ute Tribe History
  • Links: Preservation Matters Newsletters 
  • Links: Western Mining Towns 
  • Links: Stories from Park County 
New Sections:
South Park Historical Timeline
Oral Histories and Those Who Lived it

 
While the PCHS website is maintained by volunteers, there is an ongoing service provider expense.  If you are in a position to help with this expense, consider a "restricted donation"  to defray this ongoing cost of hosting our website.
Membership
Join or renew your PCHS membership now.
 
Aside from periodic fundraisers and donations, the primary source of our funding is our membership program. The funds raised are used to pay our utility expenses, maintain and supply our public restrooms, make repairs to our historic buildings, landscaping, trail maintenance, insurance, tax preparation, website, and fees to maintain our tax exempt status.  Needless to say, the term "non-profit" applies to our organization in every way. We need your help.

There are several membership plans available to fit your needs. They are:
Student K-12
Senior Individual
Individual
Family
Lifetime
$5
$15
$20
$35
$250
Your may join or renew on-line using your PayPal account or credit card.
Join or renew you membership on-line
Or, you may select your membership plan and make payment by check.
Join or renew your membership by check.
Or, if you are already a member and still want to help, you can always make a donation.
Donate to support the PCHS


Peace & Violence of Lake George
by Midge Harbour

 

2117.  Lake George. 1912. Source: South Park Historical Foundation

Lake George is a small unincorporated town stretching out on each side of Highway 24. There are two gas stations, two restaurants, a general store, a post office, a school, an auto repair garage, a trailer sales, several motels and campgrounds. There are no industries, no big resorts, no traffic lights, no local newspapers, but there is a kinship among the people that is not found in the cities.

In the summer, you will see dozens of campers parked on the side of the road while fishermen run in to get their last minute supplies from the general store before heading down Eleven Mile Canyon, Eleven Mile Reservoir, up to the Tarryalls, or over Wilkerson Pass to Spinney and Antero Reservoirs. In the fall Lake George is a hunter's haven for several weeks of the year.

The town is 37 miles west of Colorado Springs, but has been able to keep the slow pace of a "vacation" atmosphere of peace, wilderness and beauty.

In the early 1900's, there were two saloons in Lake George. One was on the east side of the South Platte River and was owned by Sam Shovelson. The other saloon was on the west side of the river and was owned by a Mr. Richards. There was considerable competition between the two men.

One day Sam Shovelson disappeared. An extensive search was carried out to locate him. No one could offer any explanation on his disappearance. However, inside his saloon, when he was discovered missing was a "set- up" of wood shavings with a candle sitting in the middle of the table. The candle had been lighted, but had evidently gone out before it could burn down the shavings. People felt that Richards and his son, Benny, must have had at least knowledge of the strange disappearance of Sam Shovelson.

Shovelson's saloon remained closed for many years. Both Richards and his son had died when the town decided to move the old saloon higher on the hill and closer to the main part of the town. When the men got the building on skids and moved it from its old location, they discovered a skeleton under where the building had been standing. It was assumed that this was the remains of Sam Shovelson and had been hidden under the floor many years before. The rumor was again circulated that Richards, in his own way, had removed his competition. The old saloon was soon remodeled and became the Lake George school house. This is the same building that is now housing the Sentinel newspaper office in the South Park City Museum in Fairplay. It was moved over Wilkerson Pass several years after a new schoolhouse was built by Doug Frost.

Lake George - Images of Times Past
1075.  Lake George. Early 1900s. Main street. At left is a hotel and John Lindberg’s restaurant. In center are stores and a dance hall. At right is a garage. Source: Steve Plutt
1069. Lake George. Post Office, early 1900s. Source: Steve Plutt

3069.  Lake George Hotel. About 1919. Credit: Dorothy Miner Ford Collection – William Norton Family

1738.  Lake George Ice Company. Early 1900s. Source: South Park Historical Foundation

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Box 43
Bailey, CO  80421

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Park County Historical Society · Box 43 · Bailey, CO 80421 · USA

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