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URGENT! NHCRN Update
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NHCRN Quarterly Update

A Publication of the New Hampshire Community Rights Network
Educating and empowering communities and elected officials about our individual and collective right of local self-governance in order to secure and protect the inherent and unalienable rights of all inhabitants of New Hampshire to economic, social and environmental justice, including the rights of nature.


Volume 3 / Issue 1
January 2017

NH 2017 Legislative Session Has Begun!

With the new administration at the federal and state levels, NH residents are bracing for a fierce fight to protect the Rights of People and Nature. These are just a few of the measures already getting underway at the NH State House.
 

LSR907: Former NH House Representative and current Derry Moderator, Mary Till worked to draft this piece of legislation to specifically authorize town moderators to perform random audits of vote-counting machines and propose a procedure for doing so.

This bill authorizes town moderators to randomly and openly audit election results prior to attesting to the accuracy of votes counted by electronic ballot counting devices to comply with Part 2, Art.32 of the NH Constitution and the right of the people to a verified accurate vote count.

This bill is currently waiting for a Senate Bill number and will likely be assigned to the
Senate Election Law & Internal Affairs Committee. For now, LSR #907 can be followed through this link. Just type in 907 in the LSR box and hit enter. It will show a bill # once one has been assigned. Even though the deadline has passed for any additional representatives, Senate or House, to add their names as co-sponsors of the bill, this bill will need support from both sides of the aisle during committee hearings. This should not be a partisan bill as it is about local control and our right to have our ballots counted by machines to be accurately verified. Currently, our moderators are charged with verifying an accurate vote count, but are being discouraged from doing so where vote counting machines are used (which is approaching 90% of NH municipalities). This is unacceptable.

"A simple audit at the district level on election night, taking 1 to 2 hours, will give confidence in these higher level races that the machines are working exactly as intended, without the time and expense involved in a statewide audit." Mary Till, Derry Moderator

Stay tuned for ACTION ALERTS on the "Audit Bill" as we need everyone to reach out to your elected officials to encourage them to fulfill their duty to uphold the NH Constitution and existing legitimate laws that empower moderators to verify the vote count.

It logically follows from the equal right to vote under Part I Articles 1,8 and 11, and Part II Article 32 of the New Hampshire Constitution that in order to give consent and hold elected officials accountable through a vote cast, people in each town, city and ward have a fundamental right to a verified accurate vote count. Such accurate vote count shall not be satisfied by sole reliance on electronic ballot counting devices in which the counting of votes cannot be publicly observed or verified as required by the NH Constitution and NH law.

 

SB 47:  This is an act relative to enforcement of election laws. Unfortunately, SB 47 is not a good bill as it empowers the Secretary of State (SOS) with autocratic power over election officials at his or her discretion. Currently, the SOS is an administrative office and the Attorney General is the enforcement office regarding election law in the state. This bill has the potential to influence local election officials to serve the secretary of state over the voters that elected them, and the Constitution they take an oath to uphold, out of fear of being accused, investigated or penalized by a single individual. This bill has been assigned to the Senate Election Law & Internal Affairs Committee, and can be followed through its docket. The public hearing for SB 47 is this Tuesday, January 24th at 9am at the Legislative Offices Building (LOB, room 102). Testimonies can be emailed to committee members through the Senate Election Law Committee link above. Here is the NHCRN testimony prepared in opposition to SB 47 to be heard on Tuesday, the 24th.



HB 203:  This bill establishes an independent redistricting commission. This bill was heard in the House Electcion Law Committee on 1/18/17 with the executive session yet to be scheduled. You can keep updated on this bill through this link, here. Following is a great testimony submitted to the committee. Testimonies can be emailed to the committee through the House Election Law Committee link above.
 

Deborah Sumner


 
 
January 19, 2017
Testimony in Support of HB 203
To: Honorable Members of the House Election Law Committee

     I am an undeclared voter and as of  Nov. 14 my non-party status is shared with nearly 43% of registered NH voters. I support the commission as part of my ongoing efforts since 2008 to support our inalienable right to free and fair elections in NH.
     Our current political system is broken. This is one tool needed to fix it.
     I’m not a lawyer, but the constitutional authority for an independent redistricting commission comes from Part I, Art. 11 of our NH Constitution. Each voter has an equal right to vote and each candidate has an equal right to be elected to office It is the duty of government to protect these rights. 
     Skewing district lines so one party can dominate an election violates the fundamental rights of voters and candidates and our right to free and fair elections.
     In my particular experience, Jaffrey and Rindge share a school district, ambulance service and strong regional ties. Yet we now have separate senatorial and representational districts, except for one district that encompasses a number of other towns that we have no community partnerships with. Ridiculous!
     It was even rumored that the redistricting was to make it harder for a certain representative disliked by the then Speaker to be re-elected. That plan worked, proving that political gamesmanship is more important to the redistricting majority than voters who had established trust and ties to that representative. The speaker and majority party “won,” but it created a bad feeling about and distrust of our government among many voters in my town, including me.
     The bill appears to be well thought out. I do support an election integrity attorney in the Attorney General’s office. In my experience since 2010, I have been disgusted with the LACK of election law enforcement from that office. My understanding is that the designated election law attorney spends a lot of time in court. A better use for that time, I believe, would be an advisory role to the Legislature and Secretary of State in preventing the need for court action. 
     An election law complaint filed with that office the end of October has not yet received a response. Is that because of a lack of resources or ‘normal”? Your committee may want to investigate whether lack of resources is why complaints are not dealt with in a fair and timely way.
     I know similar redistricting bills have been put forward in the past. I believe this one is worthy of your support as written and thank Rep. Cote and co-sponsors for their advocacy for free and fair elections in NH. Please join them!

SB11:  Known by some as the "Right to Work Bill" and others, "Right to Work-for-less", this bill drew hundreds to the State House to testify in favor and opposed to the bill. Mostly opposed, but after four hours of testimony, that did not stop the Senate Commerce Committee from holding the executive session immediately following the hearing and recommending "ought to pass" (OTP) 3-2 along party lines. SB 11 went to the Senate floor for a vote on 1/19/17. It passed with a roll-call vote of 12-11. Now, the bill crosses over to the House and begins the same process over again. It is unknown at this current time what House committee SB11 would be assigned to. If it passes the House committee and a floor vote in the House, with presumably no amendments, Governor Sununu has promised to sign the bill. You can follow the progress of the bill here.

HB145: For those familiar with the Dudley Dudley legislation in the 70's granting Durham home-rule authority over the siting of oil refineries, this bill will look fairly identical except for replacing "oil refineries" with "high voltage transmission lines". This bill is sponsored by Rep. Wayne Burton and co-sponsored by Rep. Suzanne Smith (both co-sponsored the NH Community Rights Amendment proposed by NHCRN last year).

You can view the current text of
HB145 and its progress through its docketSurprisingly, there was hardly any Northern Pass opposition present. But not surprising, there were plenty of corporate lobbyists opposed to any means of local communities deciding what happens where they live. You can read NHCRN's submitted testimony below.

The executive session for HB145 is scheduled for January 25th at 1pm at the Legislative Offices Building, room #301. Feel free to reach out to your representatives on this bill to encourage them to support local control. Testimonies can be submitted to the House Municipal & County Government Committee members up until the executive session.  



 
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NHCRN Community Rights Awareness Campaign

Help Protect the Rights of People and Nature!
 
The people and ecosystems of New Hampshire face unsustainable projects such as the proposed Northern Pass industrial hydro-energy project, fracked gas pipeline infrastructure, corporate water withdrawals, sludging of toxic human waste on farmland, and ridgeline industrial wind. Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund (CELDF) has assisted communities across New Hampshire to prohibit such harmful projects that violate the rights of human and natural communities, through local Rights-based Ordinances establishing Community Bills of Rights laws, which assert the right to democratic, community self-government - including the right to protect clean air and water.

Education empowers, and NHCRN is committed to grassroots education for residents and their elected officials. The 
NHCRN Community Rights Awareness Campaign focuses on local community self-government, which is essential to achieving economic, social and environmental sustainability in communities across the state. The campaign will assist in helping protect the rights of all residents, their communities, and nature from harmful corporate activities.

NHCRN's Community Rights Awareness Campaign includes:
The NHCRN Community Rights Awareness Campaign will help lay the groundwork to secure Community Rights throughout the state of New Hampshire. Adding Article 40. Right of Local Community Self-Government to the New Hampshire Constitution's Bill of Rights will recognize and protect those rights.

You can help, please
 donate today!
HAPPENINGS IN THE NH COMMUNITY RIGHTS MOVEMENT
 
 
 
Residents of Nottingham and Barrington have spent over ten years in a community rights battle against commercial water extraction industries intent on stealing their water. Both communities enacted Rights-ased Ordinances (RBO) that include a Community Bill of Rights that recognize, secure and protect both human and natural communities to access clean, uncontaminated water; the right to make local governing decisions that protect their health, safety and welfare free from preemption and corporate claimed rights when the rights enumerated within their RBOs are violated. After a number of years in bankruptcy, the USA Springs property and its assets have sold to Kevin Delaney, manager of Nottingham Springs, LLC. It is clear the fight for the sustainability of the Nottingham and Barrington communities is not over.  NHCRN objected to the sale of the USA Springs property to anyone intending to use the property for purposes that violate the fundamental rights of human and natural communities. Read the NHCRN letter of objection below.
 

Bankruptcy court OKs USA Springs land sale

Former owner’s bid fails in $1.2 million deal

The bankrupt USA Springs estate will sell the 189-acres site for $1.2 million to Kevin B. Delaney, a Massachusetts investor and manager of Nottingham Springs LLC.


        New Hampshire Community Rights Network                            
                                                                                        102 Lakeview Hts., Alexandria, NH 03222
                                                                                                             info@nhcommunityrights.org

10-19-16
 
US Bankruptcy Court
District of New Hampshire
1000 Elm Street, Suite 1001
Manchester, NH 03101-1708
                                                                                               
Re: Objection to the motion to sell USA Springs Inc., Case No. 08-11816-JMD
 
To Whom It May Concern:

The New Hampshire Community Rights Network (NHCRN) was established as communities within New Hampshire enacted local rights-based laws to elevate their rights over corporate claimed “rights,” and protect themselves from harmful corporate activities. NHCRN was founded to educate and empower communities and elected officials about our individual and collective right to local self-governance in order to secure and protect the inherent and unalienable rights of all inhabitants of New Hampshire to economic, social and environmental justice, including the rights of nature.

NHCRN believes that sustainable environmental and economic development can be achieved only when the people affected by governing decisions are the ones who make such decisions. We oppose for-profit corporations or other such entities, such as USA Springs Inc. and Kevin Delaney/Nottingham Springs LLC, seeking to use claimed “property rights” and privileges to violate the inherent and unalienable right of real persons to protect their natural rights as enumerated within the Bill of Rights of the New Hampshire Constitution.

Article 2. Natural Rights. All men have certain natural, essential, and inherent rights among which are, the enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquiring, possessing, and protecting, property; and in a word, of seeking and obtaining happiness…]

Residents of Nottingham and Barrington opposed USA Springs’ intent to use the property for the purpose of groundwater extraction since their original proposal in 2001. Nottingham and Barrington residents understand water withdrawal from a confined and contaminated bedrock aquifer would violate their natural right enumerated in the Article above, to protect their private property and seek happiness in the places where they live.

Against all reason and scientific evidence, permits were issued to USA Springs Inc. that resulted in drawing contamination into one their test wells. Since the USA Springs bankruptcy proceedings beginning in 2008, Nottingham residents have presented themselves before the court multiple times whenever there has been a potential buyer for the property. Each time, they have presented the potential buyer with a letter notifying them of their democratically enacted Nottingham Water Rights & Self-Government Ordinance which prohibits the corporate withdrawal of water within the Town of Nottingham to sell beyond the borders of the Town. Barrington residents democratically enacted a similar ordinance during this year’s town meeting.

Kevin Delaney’s decision to move forward with the purchase of the USA Springs Inc. property even after he has been notified of the Ordinances in both towns implies his intent to ignore the laws of Nottingham and Barrington. The Notice of Intended Private Sale filed by Kevin Delaney, a.k.a. Nottingham Springs LLC, with this court reveals his determination to exercise his "right" to profit at the cost of residents’ right to protect their own health, safety and welfare, economic sustainability, and natural environment. Kevin Delaney plans to use the Towns of Nottingham and Barrington as resource colonies for profit against residents’ democratically enacted laws.

NHCRN assists communities in elevating their right to protect themselves and the places they live, for the sake of the health, safety and welfare of residents, local economies, and environmental sustainability. Nottingham and Barrington residents impacted by the proposed sale of the USA Springs Inc. property to Kevin Delaney have overwhelmingly expressed opposition to the use of the USA Springs property for purposes of corporate water withdrawal. Approval of the court for the sale of the USA Springs property to Kevin Delaney or the Town of Nottingham accepting tax liens, does not constitute community support.

The State is charged with protecting people’s rights – the most fundamental of all being the right to local community self-government, which is the right of people to collectively decide what happens where they live. When human communities find that laws ostensibly enacted to protect them, and to foster their health, prosperity, and fundamental rights, do neither; and that the very air, land, and water – on which their lives and happiness depend – are threatened; it becomes necessary for the people to reaffirm, reclaim, and assert their inalienable rights.

Residents of Nottingham and Barrington have found that our current system of government fails to protect their right to decide to what happens where they live. Their democratically enacted rights-based ordinances reaffirm, reclaim, and assert their inalienable right to access pure water and clean air; right to the peaceful enjoyment of their homes; rights of ecosystems to exist and flourish; right to scenic preservation and government legitimacy; right of local community self-government, and the right to assert the right of self-government. Using the USA Springs Inc. property for the purpose of corporate water withdrawals to bottle and sell beyond town boundaries would be ignoring the rights-protecting prohibitions enumerated within their local laws.

Therefore, NHCRN objects to the sale of USA Springs, Inc. property to anyone intending to use the property for purposes that violate the fundamental rights of human and natural communities protected within a democratically enacted rights-based ordinance that establishes a Community Bill of Rights protecting the health, safety and welfare of both. The Water Rights & Self-Government Ordinances enacted by residents of Nottingham and Barrington do just that. Residents affected by the sale of the USA Springs, Inc. property must have the authority to make the final governing decision as to whether or not it moves forward.

Sincerely,

Michelle
Michelle Sanborn
NHCRN Coordinator, Board of Directors

www.nhcommunityrights.org
(603) 524-2468
 
Northern Pass Project Continues to Push - Update

Excerpt from: Bury Northern Pass Newsletter - Dec 26, 2016 

2016 Opposition year in review. Slow down? Anything but.

From time to time, Northern Pass floats the line that they "haven't heard" any opposition to this or that, with the implication that the new "balanced" proposal has quelled opposition. The following 2016 "opposition year in review" sets the record straight.

 
During the first half of 2016, hearings on the application and petitions to intervene at the SEC dominated opposition efforts.

Between January and June, twelve hearings on NPT's application were held by the SEC and two on the DEIS by the DOE. Close to 400 oral comments were made during the 12 SEC hearings. Approximately 75% opposed Northern Pass, 25% supported it. (A full record/transcript is not available for the two DOE hearings, but the tally of these is similar.) Only one or two supporters of NPT had no apparent vested interest in Northern Pass; all the rest were IBEW members, contractors hired by NPT, contractors hoping to be hired, Eversource employees, and others hoping to gain or representing those who hope to profit from the project.

Written comments submitted at these 12 hearings show an even higher percentage opposing Northern Pass. (So much for the myth of the "bullied" silent majority afraid to speak out in support of the project - this was their chance. Anonymous comments were accepted.)

Outside of the hearings, approximately 250 written comments on the project per se (as distinct from comments on SEC process and administrative matters) have been submitted to the SEC so far in 2016. All are being published on the website, with or without names (again, so much for the bullied silent majority myth). The breakdown is similar to that of the hearings: approximately 75% oppose, 20% support, 5% neutral. 

(In all cases above, pro and con, there were multiple comments made by the same party.)

Between December 22, 2015 and November 10, 2016, a record-breaking 170 petitions to intervene were submitted to the SEC, most during January and February. A number of these petition represented multiple parties. Under 10% of the petitions indicated support for the project.

During the second half of 2016, the action was mainly at the SEC, with opponent intervenors serving data requests on NPT for more information on claims in the application and in the project sponsors' pre-filed testimony. Numerous technical sessions, in which opponent intervenors had the chance to question the Applicants directly, ran well beyond schedule, causing delays
in the fall schedule although, as yet, no further extension of the final deadline for a decision, September 2017. The shoe is now on the other foot. Opponents' pre-filed testimony is due by December 30, 2016, with the Applicants then having the opportunity to serve data requests and question opponents in technical sessions.
 
The SEC seems to think all of this will be concluded by the end of March. The next phase, adjudicatory hearings (the "trial"), at which the SEC will be present, are scheduled to start on April 4, 2017, and run into early July, 2017.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Northern Pass communities want a say in project’s permitting process:  "In a 7-1 vote Thursday, the committee dismissed the petitioners’ plea, effectively punting the decision to subcommittees working on specific projects. The vote was an affirmation of the Northern Pass attorneys’ complaint that the creation of a separate docket would be improper procedure."

LTE Submitted to NH papers by NHCRN Coordinator, Michelle Sanborn:

 Michelle Sanborn, NHCRN Coordinator, Alexandria NH
 
Recently, a petition was submitted to the SEC regarding Eversource and its presumed authority to route the Northern Pass transmission lines across, over, under and alongside locally maintained highways. The petitioners sought a declaratory ruling from the SEC stating that Eversource must first obtain the required permits and licenses from the Selectmen of municipalities before filing for certification from the SEC, and that the SEC does not have exclusive authority to grant permits and licenses specified in NH RSA 231:161 when referring to locally maintained highways. Municipalities participating in this petition were hoping that the SEC would rule that the SEC does not preempt this state law and that Eversource would be required to follow the existing law.

The danger in asking the SEC to make a ruling on whether the SEC does or does not trump the existing authority of the municipality is that a door is opened for the SEC to set a future precedent that undermines the authority municipalities clearly have according to RSA 231:161. And, it is already clear that Eversource has not obtained the required licenses and permits from the Selectmen of the affected municipalities prior to filing their application with the SEC. The SEC committee decided, 7-1, this past Thursday, to dismiss the petitioners’ plea. The SEC made a non-decision by kicking the can down the road to subcommittees working on specific projects, instead of recognizing the authority already clearly spelled out in existing law. Municipalities are left unable to protect the health, safety and welfare of their residents and natural communities.

A growing number of communities across New Hampshire have learned that the state process for deciding projects that directly affect the health, safety and welfare of human and natural communities is akin to insanity. Insanity has been defined by Albert Einstein as, doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. These communities have thrown off their subservience and recognized they have a moral and constitutional right to make local governing decisions that protect and expand rights for residents and ecosystems. They have done so through democratically enacted Rights-based Ordinances that include a Community Bill of Rights elevating the rights of residents and ecosystems above the claimed “rights” of corporations by recognizing their authority to self-govern, free from state and federal preemptions.

Community Rights is about protecting local economic, environmental and social justices. Community Rights is codifies the right to collectively legalize sustainable activities in the places where we live. The NH Community Rights Network (NHCRN) has supported local rights-based efforts across the Granite State and proposes a statewide Community Rights constitutional amendment recognizing our right to local self-determination. In this way, every community within the state would have the recognized authority to secure, protect and expand fundamental rights to fresh air, clean water, uncontaminated soil, livable wages, protections for the LGBTQ community, locally controlled sustainable energy sources, election integrity, and safe food choices. The Community Rights amendment specifically prohibits the weakening or restriction of any existing rights.

Under the NH Community Rights amendment harmful corporate activity would be subject to local decision-making authority free from state and federal preemptions. The Community Rights amendment supports pro-accountable business. Those most affected by a project should have collective local decision-making authority over the project. NHCRN offers film screenings of We the People 2.0, Community Rights Awareness Workshop, and Democracy Schools across the state. Contact us for info on how you can participate at info@nhcommunityrights.org. You can learn more about the Community Rights Movement in NH by visiting www.nhcommunityrights.org.
Antrim Residents Should Make the Final Decision

http://www.ledgertranscript.com/Letter-Antrim-residents-should-be-in-charge-7023361

To the editor:

​The New Hampshire Community Rights Network was established as communities within New Hampshire enacted local rights-based laws to elevate their rights over corporate claimed “rights” and protect themselves from harmful corporate projects. NHCRN was founded to educate and empower communities and elected officials about our individual and collective right to local self-governance in order to secure and protect the inherent and unalienable rights of all inhabitants of New Hampshire to economic, social and environmental justice, including the rights of nature.

NHCRN believes that sustainable environmental and economic development can be achieved only when the people affected by governing decisions are the ones who make such decisions. When for-profit corporations, such as Eolian Renewable Energy LLC and Walden Green Energy LLC, through Antrim Wind LLC, force projects into communities against the will of the people who are impacted, they are violating the rights of the people to collectively decide what happens where they live.

Eolian Renewable Energy and Walden Green Energy’s decision to move forward with the Antrim Wind project reveals the corporation’s determination to exercise its “right” to profit at the cost of community rights to protect their own health, safety and welfare, economic sustainability, and natural environment. Antrim residents impacted by the proposed Antrim Wind project have overwhelmingly expressed opposition to this project throughout the SEC hearing process. Expressed support for the Antrim Wind project by the selectmen, in the face of significant opposition from residents, does not constitute community support.

Eolian Renewable Energy and Walden Green Energy plan to use the town of Antrim as resource colony for profit. NHCRN assists communities in elevating their right to protect themselves and the places they live, for the sake of the health, safety and welfare of residents, local economies and environmental sustainability.

The state is charged with protecting people’s rights – the most fundamental of all being the right to local community self-government, which is the right of people to collectively decide what happens where they live. NHCRN is opposed to the Antrim Wind projec​t because t​he residents affected by this project must have the authority to make the final governing decision as to whether or not it moves forward​, not appointed officials in board rooms miles away​.

Michelle Sanborn
Coordinator
N.H. Community Rights Network

NOTE: The Antrim Wind project was approved by the SEC against the will of abutting residents.

NHCRN co-sponsors community screenings of We The People 2.0. In 2016, NHCRN sponsored screenings in Plymouth and Concord and co-sponsored screenings in Peterborough and Portsmouth. Learn how you can host a screening in your community!
A Healthier Democracy Starts Right Where You Live  The documentary “We the People 2.0” looks at why the rights of neighborhoods and cities are essential to building a better world.
 
 YouTube CHANNEL
Anneke Campbell: We the People - Stories from the Community Rights Movement in the United States:  Coauthor Anneke Campbell discusses the timely need for Community Rights Organizing to legally establish inalienable rights for people, communities and nature for creative manifestation of social and environmental justice.
ADDITIONAL VIDEOS OF INTEREST...
Barnstead, NH - Community Vote on Water Sovereignty  A documentary of the town meeting vote in Barnstead, NH on a local ordinance to prevent corporate takeover of the community's groundwater. Dedicated to the memory of Gail Darrell.
Stay Connected - Join NHCRN on Facebook!

NEWS FROM OUR PARTNERS, AFFILIATES & OTHERS
 
Why the Founding Fathers Gave Too Much Power to the Supreme Court  What We the People lost when the Constitution gave monarchical power to a small band of unelected people in robes.
Community Rights Paper #14: Democratic Rights Matter  It all boils down to this: If you have the financial and legal ability to control the uppermost levels of lawmaking and decision making, you don’t have to abide by the rights and wishes of the communities in which you operate.
Community Rights Paper #15 – Stopping Climate Change: The Slow Train to Nowhere  The Paris Agreement will not stop climate change - most experts agree on that. What will? Only we, in our communities, can achieve the changes necessary to protect our communities and the planet.
Michele Swenson: Corporate Power Trumps Democracy The Colorado Community Rights Amendment (www.ColoradansforCommunityRights.org) reinforces the state constitutional principle that law emanates from the people, for the good of the people, and the right of cities and counties to govern to protect their health, safety and welfare free of corporate-state preemption, so long as laws do not restrict fundamental rights or legal protections for natural persons.
Merrily Mazza: Why we need a Lafayette Climate Bill of Rights  City councils, state legislators, state agencies, and U.S. senators and representatives have shown that they are either powerless to — or simply won't — protect the people from corporate harms. The industry and its minions have shut off every legal avenue to protect our communities and residents. There is no alternative to right this blatant injustice other than accept our moral responsibility and use nonviolent civil disobedience to break unjust laws.
All is not Well in Grant Township  It’s a sad story that’s repeated every day: A rural community wakes up one morning to find that it is being targeted as a dumping ground for the latest industrial corporate activity. A couple years ago, in Grant Township, PA, (population 700), residents awoke into a nightmare where an oil and gas corporation was seeking permits to force a Class II injection well into the community.
A Last Resort That Might Work: Small Town Votes In Community Bill of Rights to Ban Fracking  Concerned about the pipeline’s potential effects on air and water, residents appealed in March to local elected officials, who said it was up to state and federal agencies to approve or deny the project. Then they turned to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Finding little support at either, they finally enlisted the help of the Community Environmental Defense Fund (CELDF), a public interest law firm that advocates for local control over environmental issues.
Right of Community Self-Determination Greater Than Corporate Power in Court  Securing the right of local community self-government is pivotal when it comes to a community’s right to confront or advance vital local issues such as GMO crops, police accountability, pesticide use, fossil-fuel pipelines, living wage, rent control, or land use without the threat of state-sanctioned corporate preemption.
Darrell Moore Declaration  Whereas, we declare that if democracy means “majority rule” and “consent of the governed,” that a democracy does not exist in our communities or in the states, and that we must now create democracy in our municipalities and within the States and our Nation.
Newsletter - The Consent Of The Governed  Governments function because of the consent of the governed. When a government does not serve the needs or interests of the people, it loses its legitimacy and no longer deserves the consent of the people.
Here's How We Prepare to Be Ungovernable in 2017 According to Akuno, now is a time to fortify infrastructure for autonomy and resistance. “That’s where co-ops, land trusts, time banking, mutual exchange, community production and other new social relationships come in,” he said. “We want to build society in a prefigurative way. We want a guaranteed level of food security and energy security. We need bottom-up solutions to sustain ourselves and transform the world.”
As a Trump Administration Fast Approaches, Cities and Towns Gear Up for Political Resistance  In the years to come, community bills of rights are one strategy to shelter vulnerable populations. Back in March, when Donald Trump was facing off with two now-forgotten candidates for the Republican Party’s presidential nomination, the small town of Barnstead, New Hampshire, was quietly protecting its citizens. At their annual town hall, residents voted unanimously for a city ordinance establishing the right to freedom from forced religious identification.
Socialism for the Rich, Capitalism for the Poor: An Interview With Noam Chomsky  Consider this: Every time there is a crisis, the taxpayer is called on to bail out the banks and the major financial institutions. If you had a real capitalist economy in place, that would not be happening. Capitalists who made risky investments and failed would be wiped out. But the rich and powerful do not want a capitalist system. They want to be able to run the nanny state so when they are in trouble the taxpayer will bail them out. The conventional phrase is "too big to fail."
On Pivoting: Ideas on Organizing During a Trump Administration "...we need to be thinking about how we can simultaneously create local and state policies to prevent and /or undermine local and state governmental participation and coordinate that work with civil disobedience, direct action and strategic communications."
HELP PROTECT THE RIGHTS OF PEOPLE & NATURE!
We need your help, and it's easy to get involved. Help us reach as many people as possible by spreading the word in a few easy steps:
  • Make an online contribution to our FundRazr campaign by clicking on the large NHCRN logo below.
  • Make an "offline" contribution by mailing your donation to: NHCRN, 102 Lakeview Heights, Alexandria, NH 03222-6562
  • Help us get the word out to your friends, family and neighbors by sharing our campaign on social media.
  • Become a Host Community for Democracy by: showing We The People 2.0, organize a Community Rights Awareness Workshop, or host a Democracy School in your Town. NHCRN offers no-cost assistance to you.
  • Share photos showing your support for Community Rights on the NHCRN Facebook page.
New Hampshire communities and ecosystems appreciate your support today - and every day.

Thank you!
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