Copy
Social Ecology E-newsletter May 2018
View this email in your browser

• • • Science Driving Solutions • • •

NEWS

Social Ecology receives $1 million gift

Founding faculty member Carol Kupers Whalen endows new fund through her estate.

Carol Kupers Whalen dedicated her career to Social Ecology, starting as the first faculty member hired into the then-program in Social Ecology in 1970.

Whalen had a profound impact on students and fellow faculty members, and was involved in hiring many of the professors who joined the program and school over the years. Whalen died in 2016, and her legacy lives on both in the lives she changed and the gift she gave.

“This is an enormous gift from a person who had a major impact on our school, and it will help future students and faculty members carry on her vision,” says Nancy Guerra, dean of the School of Social Ecology.
Read More

Getting justice while doing time

Prisoners' view of the grievance process depends on outcome, Social Ecology professors find.

Prisoners seeking to complain about sweltering temperatures on the cell block, unfair treatment by guards or anything else file grievances, which are reviewed by prison officials.

The vast majority of these grievances are denied, and prisoners end up judging the fairness of the grievance process not on the merits of the process itself, but rather on the outcome, according to research by Valerie Jenness, a professor of criminology, law and society, and Kitty Calavita,
a Chancellor’s professor emerita of criminology, law and society.

Prisoners who receive a favorable outcome, they say the system is fair. But with 99 percent or more of grievances denied, prisoners often view the system as unfair.
Read More

Seeking peace in conflict-ridden cities

Professor Scott Bollens publishes new book on violence in Jerusalem and Belfast.

Peace in Jerusalem and Belfast has been elusive, and political conflict has been ever-present, even as situations in the two cities have changed.

Scott Bollens, a professor of urban planning and public policy, documents the conflict and change in those two cities in his new book "Trajectories of Conflict and Peace: Jerusalem and Belfast Since 1994." The book blends observations, personal reflections and interviews to illustrate the complex emotional and physical environments of the two cities.

“The resiliency of conflict in these cities surprised me,” Bollens says. “Sometimes there has been hopeful change, while at other times debilitating stasis and regression.”
Read More
UPCOMING EVENTS
May 8: Water UCI Middle School Challenge final event
May 23: The Water-Energy Nexus
June 6: 2042 - 25th Anniversary Celebration
STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Criminology, law and society

Justin Strong grew interested in studying criminology after getting involved in social justice activism, and seeing the effect of the criminal justice system on loved ones and community members. He was drawn to Social Ecology's Ph.D. program. "The School of Social Ecology earnestly pursues an interdisciplinary environment, which grants me much intellectual maneuverability and creativity," he says.
Read the Q&A
FRESH TAKE

How car rides foster connection


Self-driving cars will liberate parents -- and, indeed, everyone -- from a daily drudgery. Right? But time in the car is also time for connection between parents and their children, writes Jessica Borelli, associate professor of psychology and social behavior. The low level of distraction and the freedom to talk -- or not -- allows parents and kids to open up.
Learn More
JOIN US

2042 celebration


Coming up June 6: Commemorate Social Ecology’s 25 years of accomplishments as a school and learn about our vision for the next 25 years. Then be transported from the past to the future as acclaimed NASA astronaut Steve L. Smith shares his awe-inspiring perspective of our planet from space.
 
Learn More
IN THE NEWS
We're underestimating the mind-warping potential of fake video
Elizabeth Loftus, Vox

Can training eliminate biases? Starbucks will test the thesis
Emily Owens, The New York Times

Groups debate if California has gone too far on crime reform
Charis Kubrin, Associated Press
 
Newsroom
Forward
Twitter
Facebook
Website
Instagram
LinkedIn
Copyright © 2018 School of Social Ecology, All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list