News from Trinity
News from the Pews

September 20, 2020

16th Sunday after Pentecost

St Matthew, Apostle and Evangelist 

September 21
 

Matthew, the Evangelist who wrote the Gospel that appears first in the New Testament, was different from the other Apostles. He was not a popular man. Many people felt that he was unworthy to be a chosen as a follower of Jesus. Matthew worked for the Romans as a tax collector. The Romans ruled Palestine and the Jewish people in the time of Jesus. They forced the Jewish people to pay taxes to them. Many of the tax collectors cheated the people by charging more taxes than required and keeping the extra money for themselves. The Jews considered tax collectors to be traitors.

In Chapter 9 of his Gospel, Matthew tells a story about how Jesus called him to follow him and how the Jewish people felt about tax collectors. You can read it in Matthew 9:9-13. In this story, the Pharisees, a group of Jews who strictly followed all the laws of their religion, call tax collectors “sinners." Jesus knew in his heart that Matthew was not a sinner or a cheat.

Matthew wrote his Gospel for Jewish people who had become followers of Christ. He wanted his audience to know that Jesus was the Messiah that God had promised to send to save all people. Matthew’s Gospel makes clear that Jesus is the fulfillment of everything said by the prophets in the Old Testament.

Matthew is also the only Evangelist who shares the eight Beatitudes with his readers. His Gospel faithfully reports how Jesus described who will be truly blessed by God in the Kingdom and the attitudes and actions that are required for those who follow the new Law Jesus came to bring.

After Jesus’ Ascension, Matthew preached the Gospel, as Jesus asked his disciples to do. It is believed that he established Christian communities in Ethiopia and other sections of the continent of Africa. Tradition tells us that he died as a martyr.

The symbol for Matthew’s Gospel is a man with wings. Matthew wrote about Jesus’ Incarnation and his Gospel makes clear that Jesus was true God and true man. Matthew is the patron saint of bankers, because he dealt with money as a tax collector. But anyone who reads Matthew’s Gospel knows that money was not important to him. What was important was believing in and living as a follower of Christ. Matthew helps us to remember that it is our faith in Jesus that makes us truly rich!

St. Matthew is the patron saint of accountants.

 
Back to the Top

Schedule



September 20, 2020
10:30 AM Eucharist
Fr Brant Hazlett


Coffee Hour
Jim and Tracy Adams

Altar Guild
Jo Williams


September 27, 2020
10:30 AM Eucharist
Rev. Hannah Armidon


Coffee Hour
Kathy Lewis


Altar Guild
Tracy Adams & Joyce Bruce


October 4, 2020
10:30 AM Eucharist
Fr Mark Evans


Coffee Hour
Jo & Doug Williams


Altar Guild 
Mary Nelle Campbell 
Esther Schelosky

 

 

                         PARISH NOTICES



Please sign up for flowers and coffee hour.  Both are important for the good of our congregation!

 

Happy Birthday

 
                            September 22 Deb Stewart                           September 24 Jim Adams
                               September 24  Linda Welch                                           
 

Upcoming Coffee Hour Needs

 

      October 11:
                       18:
                       25:    

 

September is once again the time that we donate to the guild. St Ann's Guild does so many unknown and unseen things for the good of the parish for example having the windows of the parish hall cleaned and paying the sextons to keep the church clean.   These donations make this possible without us having to come up with creative fundraising such as a food booth at the craft fair.  If you are so inclined, please make checks out to St Ann's Guild.  Thank you!!!

Did you know?  We have a parish lending library.  It is on the wall behind the white board. Feel free to take something to read or leave something you think others might like.   The shelves are full!!!  Help yourself to a good read!

 

Parish Prayer List:  A new sheet has been provided at the back of the church.  Please take a look so we can pray intentionally for each name on the list. Can someone be moved off our prayer list? Do you know someone we should add?

 
Back to the Top

 

SCRIPTURE LESSONS

Hear, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest

September 20, 2020 - Year A


 

 
The Collect
 
Grant us, O Lord, not to mind earthly things, but to love things heavenly; and even now, while we are placed among things that are passing away, to cleave to those that shall abide; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.   Amen
 
Lesson: Jonah 3:10-4:11

10 When God saw what they did, how they turned from their evil way, God repented of the evil which he had said he would do to them; and he did not do it.

4 But it displeased Jonah exceedingly, and he was angry. And he prayed to the Lord and said, “I pray thee, Lord, is not this what I said when I was yet in my country? That is why I made haste to flee to Tarshish; for I knew that thou art a gracious God and merciful, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love, and repentest of evil. Therefore now, O Lord, take my life from me, I beseech thee, for it is better for me to die than to live.” And the Lord said, “Do you do well to be angry?” Then Jonah went out of the city and sat to the east of the city, and made a booth for himself there. He sat under it in the shade, till he should see what would become of the city.

And the Lord God appointed a plant,[a] and made it come up over Jonah, that it might be a shade over his head, to save him from his discomfort. So Jonah was exceedingly glad because of the plant.[b] But when dawn came up the next day, God appointed a worm which attacked the plant,[c] so that it withered. When the sun rose, God appointed a sultry east wind, and the sun beat upon the head of Jonah so that he was faint; and he asked that he might die, and said, “It is better for me to die than to live.” But God said to Jonah, “Do you do well to be angry for the plant?”[d] And he said, “I do well to be angry, angry enough to die.” 10 And the Lord said, “You pity the plant,[e] for which you did not labor, nor did you make it grow, which came into being in a night, and perished in a night. 11 And should not I pity Nin′eveh, that great city, in which there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand persons who do not know their right hand from their left, and also much cattle?”

 

Psalm 145:1-8

1       I will exalt you, O God my King, *
     and bless your Name for ever and ever.
 
2       Every day will I bless you *
     and praise your Name for ever and ever.
 
3       Great is the Lord and greatly to be praised; *
     there is no end to his greatness.
 
4       One generation shall praise your works to another *
     and shall declare your power.
 
5       I will ponder the glorious splendor of your majesty *
     and all your marvelous works.
 
6       They shall speak of the might of your wondrous acts, *
     and I will tell of your greatness.
 
7       They shall publish the remembrance of your great goodness; *
     they shall sing of your righteous deeds.

8       The Lord is gracious and full of compassion, *
     slow to anger and of great kindness.


Epistle:  Philippians 1:21-27

21 For to me to live is Christ, and to die is gain. 22 If it is to be life in the flesh, that means fruitful labor for me. Yet which I shall choose I cannot tell. 23 I am hard pressed between the two. My desire is to depart and be with Christ, for that is far better. 24 But to remain in the flesh is more necessary on your account. 25 Convinced of this, I know that I shall remain and continue with you all, for your progress and joy in the faith, 26 so that in me you may have ample cause to glory in Christ Jesus, because of my coming to you again.

27 Only let your manner of life be worthy of the gospel of Christ, so that whether I come and see you or am absent, I may hear of you that you stand firm in one spirit, with one mind striving side by side for the faith of the gospel,

Gospel: Matthew 20:1-16

20 “For the kingdom of heaven is like a householder who went out early in the morning to hire laborers for his vineyard. After agreeing with the laborers for a denarius[a] a day, he sent them into his vineyard. And going out about the third hour he saw others standing idle in the market place; and to them he said, ‘You go into the vineyard too, and whatever is right I will give you.’ So they went. Going out again about the sixth hour and the ninth hour, he did the same. And about the eleventh hour he went out and found others standing; and he said to them, ‘Why do you stand here idle all day?’ They said to him, ‘Because no one has hired us.’ He said to them, ‘You go into the vineyard too.’ And when evening came, the owner of the vineyard said to his steward, ‘Call the laborers and pay them their wages, beginning with the last, up to the first.’ And when those hired about the eleventh hour came, each of them received a denarius. 10 Now when the first came, they thought they would receive more; but each of them also received a denarius. 11 And on receiving it they grumbled at the householder, 12 saying, ‘These last worked only one hour, and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the day and the scorching heat.’ 13 But he replied to one of them, ‘Friend, I am doing you no wrong; did you not agree with me for a denarius? 14 Take what belongs to you, and go; I choose to give to this last as I give to you. 15 Am I not allowed to do what I choose with what belongs to me? Or do you begrudge my generosity?’[b] 16 So the last will be first, and the first last.”

 

Back to the Top
Website
Website
Images used are from Creative Commons, and unless otherwise noted, are in the Public Domain.
Copyright © 2020 Trinity Episcopal Church, All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp
Back to the Top