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Population, Education and Health Center (PEHC) Newsletter

January 2016
Volume 1, Issue 1
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Welcome to the PEHC Newsletter! The PEHC Newsletter is a quarterly newsletter discussing data, research, and events relating to the University of Missouri Research Data Center (MU RDC). The PEHC Newsletter will update you on PEHC activities and Census events.
On November 10, 2015, the University of Missouri Research Data Center (MU RDC) opened in Ellis Library. The MU RDC provides a secure environment where researchers with approved projects can access restricted-use datasets from the Census Bureau and other federal agencies. If you are interested in submitting a proposal or learning more about the MU RDC, please contact Jacob Cronin at (573) 884-9122 or jacob.cronin@census.gov, or visit our website.

Small Grant Awards


In December 2015, the PEHC awarded two grants through its Small Grant program. The awards will seed research that uses data from the University of Missouri RDC and position the awardees to apply for external funding. 
  • Chelsea DeRoche (Biostatistics & Research Design Unit and Health Management & Informatics) was awarded a grant for her project entitled “Mental health disorders and comorbid conditions in adolescents and adults.” This project will use data from the 1997-2012 National Health Interview Survey that is linked to the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (NHIS-MEPS) to better understand co-occurring mental and physical disorders (i.e., comorbid conditions) among adolescents and adults.
  • Emily Leary (Biostatistics & Research Design Unit and Health Management & Informatics) was awarded a grant for her project entitled “Utilization and disparities in mental health.” This project will use data from the 1997-2012 National Health Interview Survey that is linked to the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (NHIS-MEPS) to better understand how demographic and geographic indicators influence access to and use of mental health services.
Applications for fall 2016 funding are due May 15, 2016. Funds will be awarded in June. For more information, visit the PEHC website.  

Spotlight on Funding Opportunities

  • The University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research (in cooperation with the Economic Research Service and the Food and Nutrition Service in the U.S. Department of Agriculture) is accepting applications for its grant program entitled Understanding the Relationships between SNAP, Food Security, and Health in the National Health Interview Survey. Grants of up to $75,000 are available. Deadline: March 3, 2016. For more information, see the full guidelines.
  • The Center for Economic Studies wants to assist doctoral candidates who are actively engaged in dissertation research in economics or a related field using Census Bureau microdata at a Research Data Center. Eligible candidates must be actively working on a Ph.D. thesis in economics or a related field using Census Bureau microdata at a Research Data Center. For information or to apply, email Randy Becker at randy.a.becker@census.gov.
  • The Russell Sage Foundation is accepting applications for its grant program entitled Social, Economic and Political Effects of the Affordable Care Act grant program. Grants of up to $150,000 are available. Deadline: March 30, 2016 (Letter of intent). For more information, see the full guidelines.
  • The National Institutes of Health announces a new funding opportunity entitled Education and Health: New Frontiers. The goal of this funding program is to support research that will further elucidate the pathways involved in the relationship between education and health outcomes. R01, R21 and R03 grants are available. Standard deadlines apply. For more information, see the full guidelines.

Doctoral Fellowships Announced


In April of 2015, the PEHC awarded two Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowships for academic year 2015-2016. The fellowship includes up to a $25,000 stipend and tuition remission from the Graduate School.
  • Sarah F. May (Educational & Counseling Psychology)
  • Emilie M. Shireman (Psychological Sciences)
  • Leslie B. Hodges (Harry S Truman School of Public Affairs)
Applications for the next found of fellowships are due March 7, 2016. For more information, see the Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship application form or attend one of our information sessions, which will be held on January 21 and February 18 from 12:30 to 1:30 in Middlebush 111.

Training Opportunity!

The Cornell NSF Census Research Network node is offering a course entitled INFO7470: Understanding Social and Economic Data. Sessions begin on February 1, 2016 and end on May 9, 2016. Remote sites may participate. For more information, you may view the syllabus for the course or read about how to register and connect.

If you have questions, please contact Lars Vilhuber (lars.vilhuber@cornell.edu)

Approved and active projects

The list below reflects only those projects that are approved or active. There are many more projects in production

"Effects of organizational structure and governance on retail establishment productivity." Matthew Sveum and Michael Sykuta

“Improving the interpretability and usability of the American Community Survey through hierarchical multi-scale, spatio-temporal statistical models." Scott Holan, Christopher Wikle, Christopher Hassett, Jonathan Bradley, Matthew Simpson, and Trevor Oswald

“Neighborhood context, weight, and weight-related behaviors among Mexican American Children." Claire Altman (with colleagues at Pennsylvania State University)

“Occupational variation in health care coverage." Leslie Hodges, Colleen Heflin, and Joan Hermsen

“Effects of state immigration policy context on immigrant health & well-being.” Sarah May, Stephanie Potochnick, Lisa Flores, and Jen-Hao Chen

Mark your calendars for the PEH Seminar Series that is continuing this year on selected Thursdays at 12:30 pm. We have lined up a diverse set of speakers from MU and other institutions. Please join us!
PEH Seminar Series Schedule - Winter/Spring 2016
January 28

 

February 11




February 25




March 10



March 24



April 14

 
 
April 28

 
William Elliott, School of Social Welfare, University of Kansas
Memorial Union – Room S016

Cory Koedel, Department of Economics and the Truman School of Public Affairs, University of Missouri
Student Center – Room 2205

Jennifer Van Hook, Department of Sociology and Criminology, Pennsylvania State University
Student Center – Room 1209

 

Margaret Ralston, Department of Sociology, Mississippi State University
Student Center – Room 2205

 

Eileen Bjornstrom, Department of Sociology, University of Missouri
Student Center – Room 1209

Neeraj Kaushal, School of Social Work, Columbia University
Student Center – Room 2205

Daniel Tope, Department of Sociology, Florida State University
Student Center – Room 1209

 
New data products available
 
There are hundreds of restricted-use datasets available at the MU RDC for approved projects. The following list provides a sample of new data that have recently been made available. 
 
To view all of the data products available through the MU RDC, please see the data products lists at the Center for Economic Studies, National Center for Health Statistics, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Note that for all of these data, use is restricted to approved projects that are authorized to use the data in the MU RDC. If you wish to submit a proposal for data use, please contact Jacob Cronin at jacob.cronin@census.gov.

American Community Survey (ACS)
The American Community Survey (ACS) is part of the Decennial Census Program. This survey is sent to a random sample of households in the United States and Puerto Rico on a rotating basis. The ACS collects information from U.S. households similar to what was collected on the decennial census "long form," such as age, race, sex, Hispanic origin, income and benefits, health insurance, education, veteran status, disabilities, place of work and commuting, and housing costs. These data previously were collected only in census years in conjunction with the decennial census. Since the ACS is conducted every year, rather than once every ten years, it provides more current data throughout the decade.
  • 2014 One-Year File: The 2014 American Community Survey (ACS) one-year files are now available. This release extends the Center for Economic Studies’ (CES) holdings of ACS files to cover all survey years from 1996 through 2014.
  • 2013 Five-Year Data: The new 2013 American Community Survey (ACS) five-year datasets are organized by state, with household- and person-record files for every state and the District of Columbia, as well as Puerto Rico. Comprehensive national files are also available for each record type. A number of documentation resources are available to researchers, including ACS reports on geocoding, accuracy, subject definitions, and a handbook on using ACS data for research. In addition, a detailed codebook is available for the ACS 2013 files.
2013 Longitudinal Business Database (LBD)
A new version of the Longitudinal Business Database (LBD) is now available that includes updates for LBD 1976 to LBD 2012, as well as the new LBD 2013.  

Decennial Census 
  • 2010 Decennial Census for Island Areas: In addition to the 50 states and District of Columbia, the U.S. Census Bureau also conducts censuses and surveys in American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These areas are collectively referred to as the "Island Areas."
  • 1950 Decennial Census Public Use Microdata Sample: The 1950 Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) is a 1% sample that was produced in the 1980s in a collaboration between the Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology and the Census Bureau. The internal version of the 1950 PUMS combines three files into one: 1) the original 1950 PUMS that was released to the public, 2) the IPUMS version of this dataset with its harmonized coding, facilitating comparisons across years, and 3) the original data entry files recovered from the Unisys mainframe, which contain detailed geography and the original alpha string entries for fields like birthplace and occupation. The original data entry files also contained respondents' surnames, but while all names have been stripped from the merged file, information about similarity of surnames within a household and whether or not the respondents had a Hispanic surname is included in the file. This dataset extends the coverage of decennial census data available for research from 1950 to 2010, and two decennial census microdata files available in the RDCs, 1950 and 1960, contain harmonized coding.
  • 1960 Decennial Census Sample Microdata File: CES is proud to announce that a restored version of the decennial census sample microdata file from the 1960 census is now available. In 1960, one out of every four households was given a "long form" that asked an additional set of questions about household and individual characteristics. The 1960 census, then, was not only the first census to sample households, but at 25% was also the densest sample ever taken on a decennial census. When this dataset was first recovered from the Census Bureau's mainframe, about 250,000 person records were missing from the file. Through a collaborative effort between the Census Bureau, the National Archives and Records Administration, and the Minnesota Population Center, and funded by the National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation, the missing information was recovered by digitizing the microfilmed FOSDIC-encoded enumeration forms. This restored dataset extends the coverage of decennial census data available for research from 1960 to 2010.
Commodity Flow Survey
The 2012 Commodity Flow Survey (CFS) captures sample data on shipments originating from selected types of business establishments located in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information requested includes the following information about an establishment's shipments: domestic destination or port of exit, commodity, value, weight, mode(s) of transportation, the date on which the shipment was made, and an indication of whether the shipment was an export, hazardous material, or containerized. For shipments that include more than one commodity, respondents are instructed to report the commodity that makes up the greatest percentage of the shipment's weight. For exports, the respondent is asked to provide the mode of export and the foreign destination city and country. For hazardous materials shipments, the corresponding UN/NA code is collected.

2011 National Longitudinal Mortality Study
The National Longitudinal Mortality Study (NLMS) is a database developed for the purpose of studying the effects of demographic and socio-economic characteristics on differentials in U.S. mortality rates. The NLMS is a unique research database in that it is based on a random sample of the non-institutionalized population of the United States. It consists of Census Bureau data from Current Population Surveys, Annual Social and Economic Supplements, and a subset of the 1980 Census combined with death certificate information to identify mortality status and cause of death. The study currently consists of approximately 3.8 million records with over 550,000 identified mortality cases. The socio-economic variables available offer researchers the potential to answer questions on mortality differentials for a variety of important socio-economic and demographic subgroups that are not covered as extensively in other databases. This project has generated over 90 publications in various prominent scholarly, scientific, and public health related journals. The latest version of the NLMS is matched to National Death Index (NDI) records through 2011. 
 
2014 MEPS-IC Private List Sample Datasets
The 2014 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component (MEPS-IC) private list sample datasets is now available. The 2014 MEPS-IC data include separate files for private sector employers, characteristics of health plans offered, nonresponse data, and remarks. 

Current Population Survey (CPS)
The CPS is sponsored jointly by the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the primary source of labor force statistics for the population of the United States. The CPS is the source of numerous high-profile economic statistics, including the national unemployment rate, and provides data on a wide range of issues relating to employment and earnings. The CPS also collects extensive demographic data that complement and enhance our understanding of labor market conditions in the nation overall, among many different population groups in the states and in sub-state areas.
  • CPS Fertility Supplement: This supplement is administered every other year and we have received data from 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012.​ The Current Population Survey is a monthly labor force survey of about 70,000 households conducted by the Census Bureau for the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Every other year, women aged 15-44 in these the households are asked a series of questions about fertility. This supplement provides data on the number of children that women aged 15-44 have ever had and the children’s characteristics.
  • CPS (basic) January 2001 to June 2011 microdata: These (basic) monthly microdata files are now available.
  • CPS 2006-2012 Voting and Registration Supplement: Every other year, after answering the labor force questions in the CPS, the same households are asked a series of questions about the voting behavior of citizens aged 18 and up. Voting and registration data have been collected by the CPS every other year since 1994.
  • 2014 Current Population Survey (CPS) March Supplement: Otherwise known as the Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement, this addition extends the coverage of this survey in the RDCs from 1967 to 2014.

2002-2013 Report of Organization Survey (COS)
The Report of Organization Survey is used to update the Census Bureau's list of businesses and provides key source data for County Business Patterns and other statistical series. The coverage of this survey are all companies with payroll, and their establishments, except companies engaged exclusively in agricultural production. The data from this survey is used to maintain up-to-date company affiliation, location, and operating information for establishments of multi-establishment companies listed in the Census Bureau's Business Register. This information allows full coverage of companies that account for a disproportionately large share of business activity. The Business Register is integral to conducting, processing, and completing most Census Bureau surveys and censuses of U.S. business organizations.  

2013 Service Annual Survey
The Services Annual Survey provides estimates of revenue and other measures for most traditional service industries. The survey collects data from companies whose primary business or operation is to provide services to individuals, businesses, and governments. Collected data include operating revenue for both taxable and tax-exempt firms and organizations; sources of revenue and expenses by type for selected industries; operating expenses for tax-exempt firms; and selected industry-specific items. The Service Annual Survey provides the only source of annual receipts estimates for the service industries.  

2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS)
The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of Department of Energy sponsors the MECS to provide detailed data on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector. The MECS provides statistics on the consumption of electricity and other types of fuel. It also provides data on the capability of manufacturers to substitute alternative fuels for those actually consumed, end uses, the extent to which energy-related technologies are being used by manufacturers and other related topics. 

National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG) 2010
The NSCG is a longitudinal biennial survey conducted since the 1970s that provides data on the nation’s college graduates, with particular focus on those in the science and engineering workforce. The survey samples individuals who are living in the United States during the survey reference week, have at least a bachelor’s degree, and are under the age of 76. This survey is a unique source for examining various characteristics of college-educated individuals, including occupation, work activities, salary, the relationship of degree field and occupation, and demographic information.

2011 NCVS Public-Police Contact Survey
The Police-Public Contact Survey (PPCS) provides detailed information on the characteristics of persons who had some type of contact with police during the year, including those who contacted the police to report a crime or were pulled over in a traffic stop. The PPCS interviews a nationally representative sample of residents age 16 or older as a supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. The survey enables Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) to examine the perceptions of police behavior and response during these encounters. 

2002 National Longitudinal Mortality Study
The NLMS consists of a database developed for the purpose of studying the effects of demographic and socio-economic characteristics on differentials in U.S. mortality rates. The NLMS is a unique research database in that it is based on a random sample of the non-institutionalized population of the United States. It consists of U.S. Census Bureau data from Current Population Surveys, Annual Social and Economic Supplements and a subset of the 1980 Census combined with death certificate information to identify mortality status and cause of death. The study currently consists of approximately 3.8 million records with over 550,000 identified mortality cases. The content of the socio-economic variables available offers researchers the potential to answer questions on mortality differentials for a variety of important socio-economic and demographic subgroups not covered as extensively in other databases.

 

Questions?

For questions regarding the Population, Education, and Health Center, please contact Jacob Cronin (RDC Administrator) by email at jacob.cronin@census.gov or by phone at  (573) 884-9122. You may also visit our website.

The PEHC was established through funding from many departments and divisions at the University of Missouri, including the School of Medicine; College of Human Environmental Sciences; College of Engineering; School of Journalism; Trulaske College of Business; College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources; College of Education; College of Arts & Science; School of Health Professions; Truman School of Public Affairs, Provost’s Office, and Mizzou Advantage.
Copyright © 2016 Population, Education and Health Center, All rights reserved.


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