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Despite all the progress made every day to improve the world, only the bad news seems to make the headlines. Impact Stories of International Geneva showcases the solutions, positive results and heart-warming stories, offering a window into the positive impact International Geneva has on everybody's lives.

An Eritrean mother reunites with her children at Geneva airport after eight years of separation

Kendija, 15, and Yonas, 12, were separated from their mother when they were forced to flee Eritrea to seek safety. For eight years, the siblings experienced many hardships. Thanks to UNHCR, the children were located in a detention centre in Libya and taken to Geneva, where they were able to meet their mother again after eight years and begin their new life together in safety. 
Read about Kendija and Yonas' odyssey
Watch Kendija and Yonas reunite with their mother at Geneva airport. 
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India turns cotton waste into clean energy and income
Much of Delhi’s deadly pollution results from farmers burning unwanted parts of the cotton plant. Today, farmers have found an innovative solution to this: selling the cotton by-products as clean fuel to replace coal and wood. Thanks to UNCTAD, workshops help transform the way farmers work so that they can boost their own incomes while helping reverse the impact that burning agricultural waste has on the environment and public health.
How did India turn cotton waste into clean energy?
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“I deserve the opportunity to learn”: How 13-year-old Farhiya from Somalia is acquiring literacy skills 
Farhiya, 13, and her six siblings live in Awdinle village in Somalia, where there is no functioning local school for them to attend. In August 2018, IOM, OCHA and partners improved classrooms and water sanitation so the school could re-open. Partners complemented IOM’s efforts by providing study materials, stationery and other school accessories to over 1,000 children in the district. Since Farhiya and her siblings started attending the revamped school, they have started to learn to read and write,  providing hope and possibilities for their futures. 
Why are literacy skills so important?
© READO
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Building a resilient Haiti 
With its high risk of natural disasters and the destruction they can cause to homes and lives, it is imperative for Haiti to build a resilient infrastructure. With partners, UNOPS has been working with communities across the country to rebuild and rehabilitate amenities that can withstand severe weather conditions. Take a closer look at just how UNOPS is improving infrastructure, health, education and other public services. 
What will the new Haiti look like?
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Ending the "book famine": More international books are being made available to blind or visually impaired people
More and more books in accessible formats (braille, audio, and large print) are being made available worldwide to people who are blind, visually-impaired, or print disabled, thanks to WIPO and partners, through the Accessible Books Consortium (ABC). The WIPO-administered Marrakesh Treaty makes the production and international transfer of these specially-adapted books easier.
How is the Marrakesh Treaty changing lives?
"Books for Blind" Marrakesh Treaty – Ending the Book Famine
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Stigma-free services for women with HIV in Egypt 
Many women in Egypt are forced to leave their homes if they are HIV-positive. High levels of stigma and discrimination are one of the key factors driving new HIV infections in the country. Women and girls are often the most vulnerable. In 2016, UNAIDS partnered with the Egyptian Ministry of Health and Population to launch a pilot project called “Enhancing Sexual and Reproductive Health of Women Living with and Affected by HIV”. After three years, the pilot has reached twice as many beneficiaries as initially intended, providing them with stigma-free quality sexual and reproductive health services.
Learn more about the success of this initiative
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A real-life Chuck Norris in Greece
As a child, Rahim dreamed of being a martial arts fighter like his idol Chuck Norris.  Although he didn’t practise martial arts, he did grow up to be a fighter in another sense: a person who inspires others every day. Rahim was born in Pakistan and, due to circumstances, moved to Afghanistan, then Turkey and then to Greece, having to fight many battles along the way. When he was in Moria camp on the island of Lesbos, he volunteered to be an English teacher for camp residents and this led to him getting a job at the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) as a cash officer. Sherien Kharouba, project manager at the centre, says “Rahim is our hero, our real life Chuck Norris, who inspires us and gives us the strength to face dire situations in our lives.” 
Read about Rahim's inspirational story
© IFRC
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