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Newsletter #125
April 13th, 2018
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Editorial

In this edition of our newsletter, you'll find several recent reviews covered by our publishing team. The first is a new study concluding that diet and lifestyle may be the primary dominant factors that shape the human gut microbiome's composition; the second is an interview with the authors of an article exploring the impact of food timing on the daily rhythms of oral microbiota.

Next up is an article showing a new mechanism by which the immune system prevents potentially useful bacteria from causing gut inflammatory responses. A clinical trial also finds that a high-fibre diet may promote specific short-chain fatty acid producers to achieve better metabolic control in type 2 diabetes.

Also in this newsletter, a review demonstrating that gut microbiota manipulation early on in C-section-born infants may help emulate the gut physiological environment observed in vaginally-delivered infants; and our second "best of" document on the topic of probiotics, focusing on clinical uses.

The GMFH publishing team

Lifestyle rather than genetics has a major impact on shaping gut microbiome composition in healthy individuals
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The timing of food consumption influences the human salivary microbiota


Although recent research in humans has found that the gut microbiota follows a circadian rhythm in vitro and responds to fluctuations in the hormone melatonin, further studies in humans related to the circadian rhythms in...


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A new study elucidates how the immune system drives gut pathobiont-dependent inflammatory responses


Over millions of years, microbes that have colonized and coevolved with humans have gradually come to help regulate nutrition and metabolism processes and train both innate and adaptive immune responses. Among commensal microorganisms that colonize...


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A high fibre diet may promote specific short-chain fatty acid producers to achieve better metabolic control in type 2 diabetes


Gut bacterial communities ferment non-digestible carbohydrates and as a metabolic output produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that are involved in fibre’s beneficial effects. Activities of SCFAs include not only providing an energy substrate to colonocytes,...


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A synbiotic intervention in c-section-born infants may help emulate the gut environment observed in vaginally-delivered infants


It is a well-known fact that caesarean section (c-section) birth is related to an increased risk of both immune and metabolic diseases later in life, possibly through aberrant gut microbiota composition and/or functional diversity. However,...


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Second GMFH “best of” document on Gut Microbiota & Probiotics now available
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