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Newsletter #98
January 26th, 2017
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Editorial

Dear Friends,

Once a year, our Gut Microbiota for Health community meets to discuss the latest gut microbiota science and its current and future clinical applications. This year's meeting is coming up in March -- join us for the sixth edition of the GMFH World Summit, to be held in Paris!

This newsletter opens with a GMFH interview covering research on how flavonoids could influence obesity-related pathologies via their effects on gut microbiota.

We continue with coverage of two new studies on probiotics: a systematic review and meta-analysis showing fermented milk may improve mild gastrointestinal discomfort in healthy women, and a clinical trial showing daily probiotics may improve cognitive function in elderly individuals with Alzheimer's disease. Then, we bring you an article on how gut microbiota might contribute to weight regain after dieting, another on how the magnitude of the gut microbiota response to a dietary change seems to vary from person to person, and a final article showing how the antitumoral activity of the drug cyclophosphamide may be influenced by two commensal bacterial species in the gut.

The GMFH publishing team

Sixth edition of Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit set for March
GMFH
GMFH

Flavonoids may protect against obesity-related pathologies by modulating the gut ecosystem


Currently, a growing body of scientific evidence shows that flavonoids could exert a protective role against obesity-related pathologies by modulating intestinal inflammation, barrier integrity and gut microbiota composition and functionality. The MoBioFood (Molecular Bioactivity of Foods)...


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GMFH

A probiotic fermented milk may help manage mild gastrointestinal discomfort in healthy female adults


Gastrointestinal discomfort includes different digestive symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, borborygmi (rumbling) and flatulence, which may impact quality of life among the general population. Probiotics can potentially improve gut function through several mechanisms and...


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GMFH

The first clinical trial showing probiotics may improve cognitive function in elderly Alzheimer’s patients


Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an inflammatory condition considered one of the most common forms of senile dementia, and previous research in mice has shown that changes in gut bacteria could enhance inflammation and amyloidosis. Besides...


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GMFH

Gut microbiota contributes to weight regain in mice after obesity and weight loss


For many humans affected by obesity, the challenge of initial weight loss is less than the challenge of maintaining the weight loss over the long term. Studies in large populations have found that, while long-term...


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GMFH

The magnitude of gut microbiota responses to diet interventions may vary among individuals


It is a well-known fact that diet is a primary factor that shapes composition and functionality of the human gut microbiota. Westernization has been linked to lower taxonomic and functional diversity, although little is known...


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GMFH

Anti-cancer effect of cyclophosphamide relies on Enterococcus hirae and Barnesiella intestinihominis


Previous research has shown that the mechanisms of drug action such as chemopreventive activity of celecoxib and effects of metformin in type 2 diabetes patients appear to be shaped by gut microbial communities. A recent study,...


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