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Newsletter #141
December 27th, 2018
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GMFH
Editorial

Dear Friends,

Our newsletter begins with two studies showing how the gut microbiome of Thai immigrants to the US can change within just 6 to 9 months of arrival, providing a possible explanation for high obesity rates among immigrants.

Next comes an article about how regulatory T cells (Tregs) restrict permeability to bacterial antigen translocation by preserving the levels of short-chain fatty acids in experimental cirrhosis. Then we have a study which shows that most gut bacterial species recover gradually after four days of treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics. And finally, we discuss an article that explores how hospital versus home delivery is associated with differences in the maternal vaginal microbiota and fecal microbiota of neonates, lasting until a month after birth.

The GMFH publishing team

Two new studies show gut microbiome variance is related to immigration to the US and departure from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle
GMFH
Gut microbe populations in healthy adults may achieve almost full recovery after short-term antibiotics intervention

Gut microbe populations in healthy adults may achieve almost full recovery after short-term antibiotics intervention


The use of antibiotics has long been related to a perturbation of the composition and functions of commensal bacterial communities. Some bacteria die in response to...


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Regulatory T cells improve gut barrier integrity through preserving colonic short-chain fatty acid levels in cirrhotic mice

Regulatory T cells improve gut barrier integrity through preserving colonic short-chain fatty acid levels in cirrhotic mice


The intestinal epithelial barrier is not just a static physical barrier but rather interacts continuously with the gut microbiome and immune cells. An intact intestinal barrier protects...


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Hospital delivery may have short-term implications for both maternal vaginal and neonate fecal microbiota

Hospital delivery may have short-term implications for both maternal vaginal and neonate fecal microbiota


Studies exploring the neonatal microbiome during early life have been performed mainly in the hospital setting, with both mode of delivery and antibiotics having the most profound impact on...


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